Investment Tips for College Grads, Part 1, by Trevor Mooney


Trevor Mooney

After finishing college and finding your first job, the temptation to splurge on all the toys you’ve always wanted can be huge. Yet by taking a responsible approach to financial planning and investing in the future now, you can ensure that you will get to enjoy the fruits of your work not only today, but for years to come. These tips should put you on the right track.

1. Create a budget The first step to starting off your investment venture is to make a budget. This should include all of your regular expenses like rent, car payments, gas, groceries, eating out, transit passes, health care, and so forth. Also make sure to budget for unexpected emergencies and save a little extra for entertainment as well. Budgeting doesn’t have to mean total deprivation; it’s just a responsible look at your finances.

2. Fix your credit score Many college grads wrack up excessive credit card debt due to the difficulty of surviving on a student budget. Make repaying your credit cards a top priority in your budgeting. The larger you can make these payments, the better for your long-term financial health. It makes no sense to put money into the stock market or a mutual fund while you pay 20 percent interest on a credit card.

3. Pay off your student loans Although not as extreme as credit card debt, student loans can add up if you do not figure them into your budget. You probably want to start investing before your student loan is completely paid off, but set yourself a realistic payment plan. Figure out how much interest you will be paying, and decide if the long-term returns from your investments will outweigh the loan interest payments or not. You can find free financial calculators online to help you with this task.

— A graduate of the University of Delaware Lerner School of Business, Trevor Mooney studied economics. He was also a member of the Blue Hen Investment Club.

Trevor Mooney | LinkedIn

Investment Tips for College Grads, Part 2, by Trevor Mooney


Read more about Trevor Mooney

4. Contribute to a 401(k) or IRA If your employer offers a 401(k) plan, start contributing right away. A 401(k) is a great way to start investing, and the sooner you start, the better your returns are likely to be on the long run. Some employers offer matching contributions, which means they will contribute a certain amount on top of what you contribute. Even if your employer doesn’t offer matching, your 401(k) contributions are tax deductible, which means you’ll be earning even more through tax savings. Finally, if you don’t have access to a 401(k) program, look into setting up your own IRA, or individual retirement account. A financial planner can help you establish this tax-sheltered investment tool.

5. Make regular investment contributions Regardless of how you decide to invest, the key is to do so consistently. Measured, gradual contributions over a long period traditionally produce the best returns. The difference between starting at age 25 and contributing a $200 per month versus starting at 35 and contributing the same amount can come out to millions of dollars by retirement.

6. Diversify, and match your risk to your timeframe The key to a successful investment portfolio is diversification, so choose a wide range of stocks, funds, and other investment instruments. As a young investor, you’ll want to focus on more aggressive, higher-risk stocks and funds, which will vary more from month to month and day to day but tend to provide higher returns in the long run. As you get older, you should gradually transition your portfolio to a more conservative approach, shifting into blue-chip stocks, growth funds, and bonds.

7. Build up a rainy day fund You never know when financial issues will arise, so set aside a few months’ salary in a rainy day fund, preferably a liquid investment vehicle that will allow you to earn a small amount of interest but withdraw quickly if necessary. This way, if something unexpected happens, you won’t need to pay penalties for dipping into your retirement funds.

— While at the University of Delaware Lerner School of Business, Trevor Mooney participated in the Blue Hen Investment Club, where students make real investment decisions for the university’s endowment fund.

Division I College Football Lift Schedule 2008 University of Delaware


Trevor Mooney Here is the actual lifting schedule at the University of Delaware during the 2008 season. During the seasons I played at Washington State, the lifting and conditioning was nearly identical.

In-Season Workouts (Real Sample Weekly Workout Routine)

***In Comparison to Post-Season Workout, the Repititions and Lifts are consistent, because of the
maintanance lifting of the season

Weightlifting Philosophy and Mentality Advice

Saturday- Gameday

Sunday- After Game Lift

1) Warm Up
2) Squats 4x 8 Repititions 50% (of Max)
3) Pull Ups 4×6 Body Weight
4) Close Grip Barbell Bench 4×6 (185, 225 lbs) Light Enough To Get Soreness Out
5) Shoulder Complex 3×6 (5/10 lbs)Bent Over Flys, Side Raises, Front Raises, Hi-Rows, Bicep to Military)
6) Quad/ Hamstring Machines 3×12 Light
7)Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight
8 ) Conditioning: 12×100 yard Striders 75% of Maximum Speed

Monday- Mandatory Off Day by NCAA (Still have film and rehab if needed)

Tuesday Lift (1 day of practice during the week)

1) Warmup
2) 5 Minutes of Jump Rope (Several Different Exercises)
3) Hang Cleans 4×4 75-85% (of Max)
4) 1 Legged Body Weight Squats 2×6 Body Weight (2 Sets on Each Leg)
5) Barbell Bench 8 @65%, 8 @ 70%, 6 @ 75%, 6 @ 80%
6) Barbell Skull Crushers 3×12 85-135 lbs
7) Dumbbell Incline 3×6 (75-110 lb DBs depending on strength)
8 ) Shoulder Complex 3×6 15-30 lb DBs depending on strength (Look above for the exercises)
9) Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight

Film and Practice after Class

Wednesday (2nd Day of Practice)
No Lift, but additional conditioning after practice

Thursday (3rd Day of Practice)
1) Warmup
2) 5 Minutes of Jump Rope (Various Exercises)
3) Push Jerk 3×6 (Relatively Heavy 185-225 lbs depending on strength)
4) Barbell Shrugs 3×12 (275-425 depending on strength)
5) One-Foot Lunges 3×6 with 135-225 depending on strength
6) Pull Ups 3×8 Body Weight or with weight vest
7) Machine Pull Downs 3×12 Heavy depending on the strength
8 ) Biceps 3×12 (Various Exercises)
9) Hamstrings/ Quads Machines 3×12
10) Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight

Friday (Walk-thrus and final preparations) No Lift or Significant Conditioning

Off-Season Workouts (December-April)
***The Week Schedule given here is a sample; the repititions weights and percentages follow a Russian
Periodization scale (Which will be briefly explained in furture articles)
***Lifting during spring ball resembles in-season lifts

Winter Conditioning
Monday Lift

1) Warm Up
2) Push Jerk 3×6 (Relatively Heavy 185-225 lbs depending on strength)
3) BB Bench 10@55%, 8@60%, 6@70%, 6@80%, 4@90% (Repititions change significantly thru weeks)”
4) DB Incline 3×8 75-115 lb DBs depending on strength
5) Shoulder Complex 3×6 15-30 lb DBs (Exercises listed above)
6) DB Skull Crushers 3×6 35- 65 lb DBs depending on strength
7) Machine Pushdown 3×12 weight dependent on strength
8 ) Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight
9) Conditioning: Jump Rope ~5 minutes, hurdle work (hip flexibility), Speed Ladder ~7 minutes

Tuesday Lift

1) Warm Up
2) Hang Clean 4×4 (Heavy)
3) One Legged Barbell Squat 3×6 135-225 lbs depending on strength
4) Pull Ups 4×8 Body Weight/ Weight Vest
5) DB Rows 4×8 Heavy 80-130 lbs depending on strength
6) Pull Down Machine 4×8 weight depends on strength
7) Hamstring/ Quad machines 3×12
8 ) Biceps 3×8 various exercises
9) Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight
Conditioning: Coach’s Circuit (Brutal Agility and Speed Circuit ~Roughly 90 minutes)

Wednesday- No Lift or Conditioning

Thursday Lift
1) Warm Up
2) Clean Jerk 3×6 (heavy but with speed 185-305 lbs)
3) 1 Legged Body Weight Squats 2×6 Body Weight (2 Sets on Each Leg)
4) Close Grip Bench 4×8 weight depends on strength (185-265)
5) Barbell Skull Crushers 3×12 weight depends on strength (85-135)
6) DB Incline 8, 8, 6, 6 weight depends on strength
7) Tricep Pushdown Machine 3×12
8 ) Shoulder Complex 3×6 15-30 lb DBs depends on strength
9)Abs Isometric and Isokinetic Abs and Back ~Roughly 10 min. straight
Conditioning: Coach’s Circuit (Brutal Agility and Speed Circuit ~Roughly 90 minutes)

Friday Lift
1) Warm Up
2) Barbell Squat 10, 8, 8, 6, 6, 4 (Weights change through the weeks)”
3) Shrugs 3×12 275-405 lbs depends on strength
4) Walking Lunges 3×16 Steps 55-80 lb DBs depends on strength
5) Pull Ups 3×8 Body Weight/ Weighted Vest
6) DB Rows 3×8 DB Rows 80-130lb DBs depends on strength
7) Machine Pull Downs 3×12
8 ) Biceps 3×12 Various Exercises
Conditioning: 1000 Steps Stairmaster (100% Sprints Roughly 6-8 minutes will burn like hell after squating)
or (if injured) 20x 30 seconds bike sprints (Level 12-15) with 15 second rests

***During Spring Ball (April and May) workouts are similar to in-season lifts
***During Summer (May, June, July) workouts are similar to winter lifts and conditioning
***Pre-Season (August Two-a-Days) workouts are similar to in-season lifts

Trevor Mooney Football


As a former Washington State University football representative, tight-end coach, summer football camp instructor, and Cougar football team coaching staff member, Trevor Mooney commits to motivating and instructing youth football players. He utilizes a number of strategies for effective and efficient coaching. Here are some helpful suggestions for coaching young football players and inspiring athletic excellence.

1. Motivate on both a team and personal level. By doing this, you inspire teamwork as well as individual success. If your coaching methods are too heavily focused on one or the other, you risk alienating certain players or creating a sense of competition within the team, which can be detrimental to the team as a whole.

2. Be sincere and lend positive encouragement whenever possible. Players most often respond to feedback that inspires them to do well, so make sure to recognize individuals that make the extra effort.

3. Keep a routine of warm-ups and practice drills. Blocking skills, passing and receiving, as well as set-ups and drives are essential skills for every football player to practice.

4. Create a set list of plays for your team to know and go over on a regular basis. Construct these plays for various opponent levels and playing conditions to ensure a well-rounded playbook.